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travel

Chennai tourism

CHENNAI Tourism

1. Marina beach

Situated in the city of Chennai in Tamil Nadu, Marina Beach is a natural urban beach along the Bay of Bengal. The beach is stretched out to a distance of 13 kilometres making it the longest natural urban beach in the country, second largest in the world and also the most crowded beach in India with almost 30,000 visitors a day. Chennai tourism will guide you.

With a white sandy shore that looks as though extending to infinity, the landscape of Marina Beach is a mesmerising and serene sight to behold. The beach has a primarily sandy terrain and is dotted with plenty of merry-go-rounds and shops selling souvenirs. You could take a walk along the Marina beach with your near and dear ones or even all alone and enjoy the cool evening sea breeze along with a hot plate of crispy sundal and murukku. Watching the sun crawl upwards into the sky or even disappear into the ocean from the beach, is an awe-striking and enchanting experience.

  • Timings : Throughout the day
  •  Time Required : 2-3 hours
  • Entry Fee : Free

2. Arignar Anna Zoological Park

One of the most popular picnic spots in Vandalur, the Arignar Zoological Park is an amazing place to discover the flora and fauna of the region.  A favourite weekend spot with both children and adults alike, the Arignar Zoo is situated at a distance of 32 kilometres from Chennai city.

It is the largest zoo of its kind in South East Asia and is sprawled over an area of 1260 acres. In addition to having an extensive collection of endemic and exotic animals, visitors can experience the wild first hand with a trip to safari parks where lions and deer can be easily spotted.

Housing as many as 138 different species of organisms, this destination is every nature lover’s paradise. Arinagar Anna Zoological Park is home to a variety of animals such as Himalayan brown bear, lion, tiger, elephant and Indian civit cat.

The zoo also has a reptile house which houses various species of reptiles including the king cobra, python, viper any much more. In addition to this, they have a small built-in Jurassic park which just adds on to the excitement. Elephant joy rides, children’s park and an education centre are amongst the other special features of the park.

  • Timings : 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM (Closed on Tuesdays)
  • Time Required : 3-4 hrs
  • Entry Fee : Adults- INR 50
    Children below 2 years- Free
    Children aged  2-12 years- INR 20
    Cameras- INR 25
    Zoo round (Adult): INR 100
    Zoo round (Child): INR 50

3.  Marundeeswarar Temple

The magnificent Marundeeswarar Temple, in Tiruvanmiyur, near Chennai has the temple deity Shiva in the form of Marundeeswar or Aushadeeswarar, the God of Medicines. A fine specimen of Dravidian architecture, this temple is a must visit for anyone visiting Chennai or nearby cities. visit chennai tourism or any other site for more info

Glorified in the 7th-8th century by Nayanars (Saivite Saints), Tirugnana Sambandar, and Appar, the temple was expanded by the Chola Kingdom in the 11th century. Moreover, given the name, Marundeeswarar Temple has been a place of worship especially for people with diseases and those facing various problems with their health. The prasadam here is a mixture of sacred ash, water, and milk which is believed to cure any ailments. One must visit the temple to encounter the miraculous power it is said to have.

Timings : 9:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Time Required : 1-2 hrs

Entry Fee : No entry fee

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travel

Mumbai tourism

Mumbai tourism

1. Gateway of India, Mumbai

The Gateway of India is the best place to visit in Mumbai, was built in 1924 by George Willet to honor the visit of King George V and Queen Mary to Mumbai. Visit this place in the early morning or late evening hours to enjoy the cool breeze of the sea with your family sans the crowd. It is located next to the historic Taj Mahal Palace and facing the vast Arabian Sea, the Gateway of India leaves you spellbound in every way possible. Ferry rides are offered here to experience a stupendous view of this monument right from the sea and you can also visit other main attractions nearby.

Timings;  24×7

Location; Apollo Bandar,Colaba,Mumbai

Entery fee; Free

 

2. Red Carpet Wax Museum, Mumbai

Have you ever imagined standing next to superstars,politicians or any another celebrities striking a pose with them or taking a selfie with them? Yes, you read it right. Come to the city of dreams and fulfil this dream at the Red Carpet Wax Museum. It exhibits lifelike wax figures of prominent icons from various fields including science, politics, sports and world cinema. So, take selfies with your favorite icon, post it on social media, and make your friends jealous. This is my 3rd best place to visit in Mumbai.

  • Location: Amrut Nagar, Ghatkopar West, Mumbai
  • Timings: 09:45 am to 09:30 pm; every day
  • Entry Fee
    Weekdays – ₹250 per person
    Weekends – ₹350 per person.

 

4. Haji Ali Dargah, Mumbai

We are talking about Haji Ali Dargah that houses the tomb of Sayed Peer Haji Ali Shah Bukhari. This grand edifice is made of white marbles and exemplifies the Indo-Islamic style of architecture. A walk through the causeway that connects the Dargah to the Lala Rajput Rai Marg is the main attraction of this place. Feel the spirituality of this place with your dear ones while enjoying a panoramic view of the deep blue waters! I give the places Fab rank no.4 among all the best places to visit in Mumbai.

  • Location: Dargah Road, Mumbai
  • Timings: 05:30 am to 10:00 pm; every day
  • Entry Fee: N/A

 

5. Elephanta Caves, Mumbai

Elephanta caves is one among the historical places in Mumbai.It has five caves dedicated to Hindu god Shiva and two caves depicting Buddhist architectures. To reach this place, you need to take a one-hour ferry ride from the Gateway of India, during which you can also enjoy the scenic beauty of Mumbai. Those who lack the spirit of a trekker can hop on the toy train that will take you on a tour of the caves right from the entry point. The restaurant and canteen run by MTDC can take care of your hunger pangs. If you are planning a one-day tour to the Elephanta caves, this blog will give you more details.

  • Location: Gharapuri, Mumbai
  • Timings: 9:00 am to 5:30 pm; closed on Mondays
  • Entry Fee:
    Citizens of India, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, & Thailand – ₹10 per person
    Other foreign citizens – ₹250 per person

Separate charges involved for videography, toy train ride, and ferry ride.

 

6. Siddhivinayak Temple

One of the most famous temples in Mumbai, the Siddhivinayak temple is dedicated to Lord Ganesh. Devotees from across India including famous personalities from Bollywood and sports throng the temple to seek the blessings of Siddhivinayak Ganapati. The auspicious idol of Lord Ganesha is carved out in a single black stone with the trunk bent towards right making it one-of-its-kind. You can plan a visit to this temple with your family for an enriched spiritual experience.

  • Location: Khed Galli, Prabhadevi, Mumbai
  • Timings: 05:30 am to 10:00 pm; every day
  • Entry Fee: NA

 

to be continued…….

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travel

Japan

Japan

 

1. Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park

While little need be said here of the horrors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima in August 1945, much can be said of the incredible efforts this vibrant city has made to commemorate the many victims of the world’s first nuclear attack, and perhaps even more importantly, the symbol of lasting peace Hiroshima has since become. Visited by more than a million people each year, many from overseas, Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park (Hiroshima Heiwa Kinen Kōen) lies at the epicenter of the atomic blast in what was once a bustling part of the city and includes a number of important monuments, memorials, and museums relating to the events of that fateful day. In addition to the grounds and gardens with their colorful cherry blossoms, the park’s highlights include the Peace memorial Museum with its numerous exhibits dealing with the issue of world peace, and the Memorial Cenotaph and the flame of peace , as well as the Atom bomb domb, the ruins of an administrative building that lay at the center of the explosion in Japan.

2. Imperial Tokyo

Tokyo’s most famous landmark, the Imperial Palace with its beautiful 17th-century parks surrounded by walls and moats, is a must-see when visiting the nation’s capital. Don’t be put off by the fact that the majority of the palace is closed to the public (it’s still in use by the Imperial family), as there is still enough to see simply by strolling the grounds. In addition to the many fine views of the palace from numerous points in the surrounding parkland – including the famous Nijubashi Bridge, or “double bridge,” so named for its watery reflection – visitors are permitted into the East Higashi-Gyoen Garden and other areas that are opened to the public as part of an organized tour. Another must-see for tourists visiting Tokyo is the famous Ginza shopping district, home to the Kabuki-za Theatre with its Kabuki performances, as well as the Shimbashi Enbujo Theatre with its traditional Azuma-odori dances and Bunraku performances.

3. Mount Fuji

Japan’s most recognizable landmark, majestic Mount Fuji (Fuji-san) is also the country’s highest mountain peak, towering 3,776 meters over an otherwise largely flat landscape to the south and east, and tall enough to be seen from Tokyo more than 100 kilometers away. Mount Fuji has for centuries been celebrated in art and literature and is now considered so important an icon that UNESCO recognized its world cultural significance in 2013. Part of the Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park, Mount Fuji is climbed by more than a million people each summer as an act of pilgrimage, which culminates in watching the sunrise from its summit. While some still choose to begin their climb from the base, the majority of climbers now start from above the halfway mark, at the 5th Station, resulting in a more manageable six or so hour ascent. Of course, for many, simply viewing the mountain from the distance, or from the comfort of a speeding train, is enough to say “been there, done that.”

4. The Island Shrine of Itsukushima

Just a short ferry ride from mainland Hiroshima is the island of Miyajima, famous the world over as Japan’s Shrine Island. Covering an area of 30 square kilometers in Hiroshima Bay, Miyajima is best known as the home of the Itsukushima Shrine, a Shinto temple dedicated to the Princess daughters of the wind god Susanoo. Dating from the eighth century, the majority of the shrine’s buildings rise out of the waters of a small bay supported only by piles. The effect at high tide is simply stunning, making these structures – including the famous Great Floating Gate (O-Torii) – appear as if they’re floating on water. Linked together by walkways and bridges, it’s a fascinating place to explore, in particular its larger halls such as the exquisite Honden (Main Hall), the Offerings Hall (Heiden), the Prayer Hall (Haiden), and the Hall of a Thousand Mats (Senjokaku). Another notable feature is the shrine’s stage where visitors are entertained with traditional dances and musical performances. Also worth exploring are the island’s exquisite grounds and gardens, home to wild deer and numerous bird colonies.

6 Temple City: Historic Nara

Temple City: Historic Nara

 For centuries the hub of Japanese culture, the lovely unspoiled city of Nara is home to a large number of historic buildings, along with important national treasures and works of art. In addition to its many historic streets, the city boasts numerous important old temples, including the magnificent seventh-century Kofuku-ji Temple, perhaps the best known of the Seven Great Temples of Nara; and the splendid eighth-century Todai-ji (Great East Temple), famous for its huge bronze statue of the Great Buddha (Daibutsu), cast here in AD 749. Also of interest in Todai-ji are its Great South Gate (Nandaimon), a two-story structure borne on 18 columns with two Nio statues standing eight meters tall and guarding the temple entrance, and the Hall of the Great Buddha, the world’s largest timber building.

7. Osaka Castle

Osaka Castle

Built in 1586 by famous Japanese warrior and politician Toyotomi Hideyoshi, Osaka Castle (Ōsaka-jō) was at the time the largest and most important fortress in the country. Although destroyed and rebuilt a number of times since, the present structure, built in 1931, remains true to the original. Highlights of a visit include the huge five-story, 42-meter-tall main tower built on an imposing 14-meter-tall stone base and home to a number of displays detailing the history of the castle and the city; be sure to visit the top floor for its superb views over Osaka, an especially attractive sight as the sun sets. Also of interest in Osaka Castle Park is the Hokoku Shrine, while Osaka’s best-known temple, Shitennō-ji, is also worth visiting and dates back to AD 59. Notable as Japan’s first Buddhist temple, this lovely shrine features a five-story pagoda along with a number of other exquisitely decorated buildings including the Golden Pavilion (Kondō) with its fine statues and paintings, the Lecture Hall (Kōdō), and a lovely covered corridor linking three of the site’s gates.

8. Chūbu-Sangaku National Park and the Japanese Alps

Chūbu-Sangaku National Park and the Japanese Alps

Japan boasts a number of outstanding areas of natural beauty, many of them designated as national parks or, in some cases, UNESCO World Heritage Sites. One of the country’s most spectacular parks is Chūbu-Sangaku National Park in the center of Honshu, incorporating in its northern and central regions the group of mountains collectively referred to as the Hida Mountains, or Japanese Alps. The region contains some of the highest peaks in the country, including Hotaka at 3,190 meters, and Yari at 3,180 meters. Similar in many ways to the Alps of Central Europe – both in the character of the landscape and in its abundance of snow in winter – the Japanese Alps attract large numbers of walkers and climbers in summer and skiers in winter. Of particular interest is the park’s abundance of flora and fauna, including the rare ptarmigan and mountain antelopes found at higher altitudes. The park’s many hot springs also draw visitors and led to the development of various spas and holiday resorts, the best known being Kamikōchi.

Accommodation: Where to Stay in Kamikochi 

9 The Atsuta Shrine, Nagoya

The Atsuta Shrine, Nagoya

The Atsuta Shrine, NagoyaShare:

The Atsuta Shrine, in the heart of the city of Nagoya, is the most important Shinto shrine in Japan, and attracts more than five million visitors each year. Established in the first century, this religious site is famous for its preserved Imperial insignia, the “grass-mowing sword” (kusanagi-no-tsurugi), one of only three in the country. Also of interest are its principal shrine, Hongu, surrounded by an enclosing wall, and the treasury with its numerous works of art, including old and modern paintings, ceramics, jewelry, and traditional masks. While in Nagoya, be sure to also visit Nagoya Castle, a splendid moated complex built in 1612 boasting a 48-meter-high main tower that is famous for its two gilded dolphins (shachi), its museum containing art treasures from the former palace, and its spectacular views over the city and the Nobi Plain.

10. Sapporo, Hokkaido

Sapporo, Hokkaido

Located on Japan’s northernmost island, Hokkaido, the city of Sapporo offers many things to see and do for tourists. As the island’s largest city, it’s a hub of cultural activity, hosting many excellent events and festivals; a distinctive culinary style; a rich theatrical history; and plenty of museums, galleries, and parks. The focal point here is very much the city’s attractive downtown area, the center of which is Odori Park, a large swath of green that’s very pleasant to explore. From here, you can also access points of interest such as the Sapporo TV Tower, as well as the city’s famous aerial tramway, an easy walk away. The Mount Moiwa Ropeway will eventually get you to the summit’s Upper Station, from where you can enjoy incredible views over the city, a real treat at night. The mountain is also the location of the Mount Moiwa Ski Resort, a popular winter destination, especially since the 1972 Winter Olympics were held in the city. And if you’re arriving in winter, be sure to visit the Sapporo Snow Festival, held here each February and drawing in excess of two million revelers.

Tips for Making the Most of Your Visit to Japan

  • Shoulder Season Travel: Due to its being blessed with so many amazing points of interest, Japan’s top attractions can, during the peak summer months, get rather busy. If you can be flexible with your trip planning, create an itinerary that will allow you to explore this beautiful country during the quieter shoulder seasons. You’ll not only be rewarded by fewer lineups, but will be able to enjoy things other visitors will miss out on: spring cherry blossoms in places like Nara Park; amazing fall colors in the hillside spa destination of Jozankei Onsen; and historic structures such as Fukuoka Castle blanketed in snow. Japan.
  • Faster Than a Speeding Bullet (Train): Thanks to its superb modern and efficient public railway system, Japan is an easy country to get around. Japan Railways is responsible for more than 21,000 kilometers of rail lines, connecting all points to larger cities such as Tokyo. The best of these is the Shinkansen Bullet Train, capable of traveling 320 kilometers per hour, making a trip such as Tokyo to Fukuoka – some 1,170 kilometers away – doable in just over six hours. Be sure to pick up your Japan Rail Pass or book your rail tours before departure to ensure savings.

 

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Switzerland

               Switzerland

One of the most expensive countries in Europe Switzerland is often skipped over by budget travelers.

Visiting Switzerland is not cheaper. Before you even get out of the train station/airport, you’ll begin to wonder “how the heck did I spend so much money already?!”

Even when I was backpacking Switzerland, I found myself constantly trying to find ways to save money.

Yet, while it is not a cheap destination, Switzerland is one of the most beautiful places on earth.

The country is home to shimmering lakes, picturesque mountains (hello Alps!), tiny walled medieval towns, soaring peaks, endless green fields you want to run through, delicious chocolate, icnredible beer, and friendly, welcoming people.

Everything runs on time here, the country is safe, and everyone is super nice. I loved my time traveling around Switzerland.

The country rocks no matter what time of the year you visit (summer hiking, winter skiing).

To help lower your costs, use this travel guide to Switzerland to help you plan your trip and save money!

1.Things to do and travel

a. Fasnacht Spring Carnival

This festival in Basel is a three-day party that welcomes in the warm weather and takes place annually on the Monday following Ash Wednesday. It’s something that’s highly anticipated by both tourists and locals, and it’s definitely Switzerland’s most popular festival. Fasnächtlers dress in elaborate costumes to hide their identities and parade around town with “cliques” (bands playing basler drums and piccolos). All the bars and restaurants in town remain open throughout the entire three days. Everyone here is in a good mood!

b. Rhine Falls

Pack a picnic lunch and look out at your view of Europe’s largest waterfall. If you hop on a boat tour you can get extra close to the giant rock in the middle of the falls, and you’ll also experience the Rhine Falls Basin. Nearby in the town of Schaffhausen, you’ll find a medieval castle which also houses a hostel for cheap but interesting accommodations.

c. Geneva

As the third largest city in Switzerland, Geneva offers spectacular views of the city’s lake (Lake Geneva), the world’s largest fountain, the UN, a historic city center, and a collection of international restaurants to satisfy anyone’s palate (thanks to the UN buildings in town). While you’re here make sure you check out the Geneva’s Art and History Museum or the Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum. There are 40 museums here in total!

d. St. Gallen

The seventh largest city in Switzerland, St. Gallen boasts beautiful museums, colorful murals, and one-of-a-kind architecture. It doesn’t receive as much tourist traffic as the other cities and regions around the country, but it’s a fun town full of students and you’re likely to befriend a few locals during your visit. Must-do: visit the Baroque cathedral and the Abbey Library, which is home to nearly 170,000 documents. Some are hand-written and over a thousand years old!

e. Visit the Old Villages

Visit the Graubunden area of the country, where you’ll find villages with houses dating back to the 13th century. Here they also speak an ancient language called Romanch, which has died out everywhere else in the country and the locals take great pride in keeping the tradition alive. Of course, it’s a haven for nature lovers – there are 615 lakes and 150 valleys in the region. Visiting here is a true Swiss Alpine experience.

f. Romantic time in Montreux

With a picturesque castle (Chateau de Chillo) lying at the edge of a lake, this area makes for a pretty romantic destination. Tour the castle, which dates all the way back to the 12th century and inspired the likes of Lord Byron, Mary Shelley, and more. The town was also the home of Freddie Mercury and there is a statue here in his honor. It costs 12.50 CHF ($12.55 USD) to visit the castle.

g. Rural culture in Appenzell

This small village of 7,000 lies in the canton of Appenzell Innerrhoden. There are no cars and the village has upheld much of its local traditions and culture, including dance and folk music. It’s an incredibly picturesque little town, with frescoed buildings and narrow alleyways. Its location near the foot of the Alpstein mountains makes it a great gateway for participating in summer and winter outdoor activities, like hiking and skiing. Take the Appenzell Railway to Wasserauen, and explore the fascinating prehistoric Wildkirchli caves (inhabited around 40,000 years ago).

h. Visit Lucerne

You can’t get much more of a typical Swiss destination than Lucerne. Located on the beautiful Lucerne Lake, the city offers a wonderful combination of urban life and nature. Spend some time in the old town, especially Weinmarkt, surrounded by medieval guildhalls and decorative buildings. Cross Chapel Bridge, the world’s oldest surviving truss bridge, and pay attention to the 17th-century ceiling paintings showing events from Lucerne’s history.

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